Connecting Women: Women, Gender and ICT in Europe in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Century

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The site is meant to be a think tank OF and FOR women's rights, sexual rights and internet rights activists, academics, journalists and advocates. We carry articles, news, podcasts, videos, comics and blogs on internet policy and cultures from a feminist and intersectional perspective, privileging voices and expressions from Africa, Asia, Latin America, Arabic-speaking countries and parts of Eastern Europe. Skip to main content. Cultivating Violence Through Technology? Publication date:.

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Search history: Examining pornography on the internet. This course examines the growth and development of American legal institutions with particular attention to crime and punishment, slavery and race relations, the role of law in developing the economy, and the place of lawyers in American society, from colonial times to the present. Special Instructions: Any student may write a paper in lieu of the final exam with consent of instructor. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section 01 into section 02 , which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor.

Elements used in grading: Final exam or paper. Automatic grading penalty waived for writers. America as a World Power: U. Foreign Relations, to Present. This course will examine the modern history of American foreign relations, from to the present. Beginning with the fateful decision to intervene in the First World War, it will examine the major crises and choices that have defined the "American Century.

Students will be expected to undertake their own substantial examination of a critical episode in the era studied. Same as LAW We then study large parts of the debates at the Constitutional Convention, primarily using Madison's Notes. Next come the ratification debates, including readings from antifederalist writers, about half of The Federalist, and overviews of the Virginia and New York ratification conventions.

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We conclude with the addition of the Bill of Rights. Classes consist of a combination of lecture and extensive participation by students. Elements used in grading: Exam. How Americans considered problems such as slavery, imperialism, and sectionalism.

Gender and Women's Studies and English MA | Lancaster University

Topics include: the political legacies of revolution; biological ideas of race; the Second Great Awakening; science before Darwin; reform movements and utopianism; the rise of abolitionism and proslavery thought; phrenology and theories of human sexuality; and varieties of feminism. Sources include texts and images. This course addresses U. Because of the breadth of the subject matter, the view will necessarily be partial.

In particular we will take as our focus the way the Constitution has provided a point of political mobilization for social movements challenging economic and social inequality. Readings will include both legal and historical materials with a focus on the relationship between law and society. Paper extensions will be granted with instructor permission. No automatic grading penalty for late papers. The Civil War and Reconstruction Era, to This course explores the causes, course, and consequences of the American Civil War.

The Civil War profoundly impacted American life at national, sectional, and constitutional levels, and radically challenged categories of race and citizenship. Topics covered include: the crisis of union and disunion in an expanding republic; slavery, race, and emancipation as national problems and personal experiences; the horrors of total war for individuals and society; and the challenges--social and political--of Reconstruction.

The American economy from colonial times to the present, illustrating the role of history in economic life. Topics: U. Prerequisite: 1 or 1V. History of Higher Education in the U. Major periods of evolution, particularly since the midth century. Premise: insights into contemporary higher education can be obtained through its antecedents, particularly regarding issues of governance, mission, access, curriculum, and the changing organization of colleges and universities.

Inequality: the Last , Years. This seminar traces the evolution of resource inequality from the Stone Age to the present. Only this long-term perspective reveals the forces that drive inequality and allows us to address two key questions: what causes inequality, and what factors have been capable of reducing it, at least for a while? We are going to confront challenging arguments: that inequality has been closely tied up with overall economic and human development, and that over the long course of history, war, revolution and pestilence were the most effective equalizers of income and wealth.

This class will help you appreciate contexts and complexities that are usually obscured by partisan polemics and short-term thinking. Seminar participants will be directly involved in the instructor's current research project on the history of inequality. This course explores the transition from Victorian to modern American womanhood by asking how Native, European, African, Mexican, and Asian American women navigated the changing sexual, economic, and political landscapes of the twentieth century. Through secondary readings, primary sources, films, music, and literature we explore the opportunities and boundaries on groups of women in the context of historical events that included immigration, urbanization, wartime, depression, the Cold War, as well as recurrent feminist and conservative political movements.

A History of North American Wests. The history, peoples, and natural systems of a region that has never been contained within a single empire or nation state, but has been united by the movement of peoples, species, and things. Topics include smallpox, horses, gold, salmon, rivers, coal, and oil.

Explores the working lives, social worlds, political ideologies and cultural expressions of African Americans from emancipation to the early civil rights era. Topics include: the transition from slavery to freedom, family life, work, culture, leisure patterns, resistance, migration and social activism.

Draws largely on primary sources including autobiographies, memoirs, letters, personal journals, newspaper articles, pamphlets, speeches, literature, film and music. Immigration Debates in America, Past and Present. Examines the ways in which the immigration of people from around the world and migration within the United States shaped American nation-building and ideas about national identity in the twentieth century. Focuses on how conflicting ideas about race, gender, ethnicity, and citizenship with respect to particular groups led to policies both of exclusion and integration.

Part One begins with the ways in which the American views of race and citizenship in the colonial period through the post-Reconstruction Era led to the passage of the Chinese Exclusion Act in and subsequently to broader exclusions of immigrants from other parts of Asia, Southern and Eastern Europe, and Mexico.

Explores how World War II and the Cold War challenged racial ideologies and led to policies of increasing liberalization culminating in the passage of the Immigration Act, which eliminated quotas based on national origins and opened the door for new waves of immigrants, especially from Asia and Latin America. Though it ended twenty years ago, we still live in a world shaped by the Cold War.

Beginning with its origins in the mids, this course will trace the evolution of the global struggle, until its culmination at the end of the s. Students will be asked to ponder the fundamental nature of the Cold War, what kept it alive for nearly fifty years, how it ended, and its long term legacy for the world.

A Brief History of Women's Rights

As distinguished from the lecture taught in previous quarters, this class will closely investigate ten major Cold War battlegrounds over the quarter. Students will be asked to consult a combination of original documents and recent histories. Martin Luther King, Jr. Using the unique documentary resources and publications of Stanford's King Research and Education Institute, this course will be taught by Professor Carson and his colleagues at the Institute.

It will provide a general introduction to the life and legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr. In addition to lectures, the course will include presentations of documentaries such as Eyes on the Prize. Students will be expected to read the required texts, participate in class discussions, and take a final exam or submit a research paper or an audio-visual project developed in consultation with the professor.

Topics include: McCarthyism and the Cold War; ethnicity and racial identify; changing sex and gender relationships; the civil rights and anti-war movements; and mass media. The documents assembled and published by Stanford's King Research and Education Institute provide the source materials for this exploration of King's swift rise to international prominence as an articulate advocate of global peace and justice.

Was a republican form of government even possible in 19th-century Mexico after years of colonial rule under the Spanish monarchy? Was the Spanish colonial heritage a positive or a negative legacy according to 19th-century Mexican politicians? How were they to forge a new national identity with so many ethnically and culturally diverse peoples throughout the territory?

These are some of the questions we will explore in this course. Journeying from the late colonial period c. Mexico was not an impossible republic, but rather another kind of republic. Mexican Migration to the United States. This class examines the history of Mexican migration to the United States. In the United States we constantly hear about Obama's immigration plan, the anti-immigrant laws in Arizona, and the courage of DREAM Activists; in Mexico news sources speak about the role of remittances, the effect of deportations, and the loss of life at the border.

Unfortunately, few people truly understand the historical trends in these migratory processes, or the multifaceted role played by the United States in encouraging individuals to head there. Moreover, few people have actually heard the opinions and voices of migrants themselves. This course seeks to provide students with the opportunity to place migrants' experiences in dialogue with migratory laws as well as the knowledge to embed current understandings of Latin American migration in their meaningful historical context.

This course is an introduction to the history and diverse peoples of modern Mexico from to the present. Through lectures, discussions, primary and secondary readings, short documentaries, and written assignments, students will critically explore and analyze the multiplicity of historical processes, events and trends that shaped and were shaped by Mexicans over the course of a century.

The course will cover some of the social and political dimensions of rural social change, urbanization and industrialization, technological innovation and misuse, environmental degradation and conservation, education, ideology, culture and media, migration, and the drug trade. Policy discussions of regime change by US politicians, journalists and pundits usually focus on Iraq, Iran, Syria and North Korea, often with little or no historical context or perspective.

This course does the opposite and takes seriously the proverbial saying "if history is any guide Investigates the rationales, motivations and strategies behind U. In this course we will watch and critique films made about Latin America's 20th century revolutions focusing on the Cuban, Chilean and Nicaraguan revolutions.

We will analyze the films as both social and political commentaries and as aesthetic and cultural works, alongside archivally-based histories of these revolutions. Israel-Palestine is one of the most difficult subjects to talk about, in large part because we in the United States do not have much exposure to Palestinian history, culture, and politics in their own terms. This course aims to humanize Palestinians and asks why Palestinian claims to rights are illegible for much of the American public. We begin to answer this question by examining a broad sampling of history, structures of power and law, culture, and contemporary political issues.

This course explores the full expanse of Jewish life today and in the recent past. Explored in depth will the ideas and practices of Zionism, the content of contemporary secularism and religious Orthodoxy, the impact Holocaust, the continued crisis facing Israel and the Palestinians. Who is to be considered Jewish, in any event, especially since so many of the best known Spinoza, Freud, Marx have had little if anything to do with Jewish life with their relationships to it indifferent, even hostile?.

Explores the contested politics of these societies in modern times. Topics include controversies surrounding the meaning of revolution, state building, war, geopolitics, Islamic law, clerical authority, gender, an Islamic economy, culture and ethnic, national and religious identities from the s to the present. Assignments will focus on primary sources especially legal documents, poetry, novels, and memoirs and films. Zionism from its genesis in the s up until the establishment of the state of Israel in May, , exploring the historical, ideological and political dimensions of Zionism.

Topics include: the emergence of Zionist ideology in connection to and as a response to challenges of modernity; emancipation; Haskalah Jewish enlightenment ; other national and ideological movements of the period; the ideological crystallization of the movement; and the immigration waves to Palestine. The evolution of cities in the early imperial, medieval, and early modern periods. Topics include physical structure, social order, cultural forms, economic roles, relations to rural hinterlands, and the contrast between imperial capitals and other cities.

Comparative cases from European history. Readings include primary and secondary sources, and visual materials. China: The Northern and Southern Dynasties. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for D. Examines one of the most dynamic periods of Chinese history with the emergence of the institutional religions Buddhism and Daoism , the development of the garden as an art form, the rise of landscape as a theme of verse and art, the invention of lyric poetry, and the real beginnings of the southward spread of Chinese civilization.

Japan in the Age of the Samurai. Topics include the three great unifiers, Tokugawa hegemony, the samurai class, Neoconfucian ideologies, suppression of Christianity, structures of social and economic control, frontiers, the other and otherness, castle-town culture, peasant rebellion, black marketing, print culture, the floating world, National Studies, food culture, samurai activism, black ships, unequal treaties, anti-foreign terrorism, restorationism, millenarianism, modernization as westernization, Japan as imagined community.

This course considers the political, economic, social, cultural, and artistic effects of the introduction of new technologies and media to modern China and Japan. The methodology will integrate techniques gleaned from the disciplines of history and literary studies. Our cross-discipline exploration will encompass printed books and images, language reform, communication technology, serialized fiction and commercial journalism, propaganda and censorship, cinema, comics, animation and television, gaming, and the internet.

Through examination of these topics we will investigate a wide range of issues including nationality, ethnic identity, class, revolution, cultural identification, gender, sexuality, literacy, colonialism, imperialism, consumerism, materialism, and globalism, to name just a few. Throughout the course we will be attentive not only to the ways that new technology and media are represented in cultural materials but also how they are materialized in these products through the acts of adaptation, translation, transliteration, and remediation. This work will in part be facilitated by the Massive Multiplayer Humanities pedagogical model, which involves flipped classrooms, faculty curated online archives, and student initiated group work.

This lecture course provides a general introduction to the history of modern Korea. This course charts major historical transformations in modern China, and will be of interest to those concerned with Chinese politics, culture, society, ethnicity, economy, gender, international relations, and the future of the world. Beijing, Shanghai, and the Structure of China.


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China's modern history through the rivalry of its two most important cities. After following the cities' history through the warlord period, the "Shanghai decade" of Nationalist rule, and the Japanese occupation, the course examines the two cities' developments under Mao and Deng. The course concludes with a look at their current relations and roles, and the transformed nature of China's cities.

Global History: The Ancient World. This course examines the emergence of "world empires"-- the first way of constituting a world-- in four regions of the eastern hemisphere from the first millennium BCE to the year CE. It will study the pivotal role of cities, the importance of rulers, the incorporation of diverse peoples, and how the states that followed their collapse constituted new world orders through combining imitation of the vanished empire with the elaboration of the new "world religions.

The White-blouse revolution : female office workers since 1870 /

Course is offered for 3 OR 5 units. Topics include early globalization and cross-cultural exchanges; varying and diverse cultural formations in different parts of the world; the growth and interaction of empires and states; the rise of capitalism and the economic divergence of "the west"; changes in the nature of technology, including military and information technologies; migration of ideas and people including the slave-trade ; disease, climate, and environmental change over time. Designed to accommodate beginning students, non-majors, and more advanced history students.

How did empires and nation-states evolve around the globe during the modern period? How did they shape global experiences of modernity? And how can one write a history of the entire world, so as to cover the necessary ground, but also preserve nuance and complexity? In this course we will use graphic novels paired with archival sources and historical essays to examine modern world history from the 18th to the 21st century, from the age of empires and revolutions, through the World Wars, the Cold War, and the War on Terror. The class is appropriate for beginning students, non-majors, and more advanced history students, and may be taken for different levels of credit.

Doing the History of Race and Ethnicity. How does ethnicity and race operate in different time periods, and across different historical, national, and cultural contexts? This course guides students through an historical and cross-cultural exploration of ethnoracial identity formation, racism, ethnopolitics, migration, belonging, and exclusion, using primary and secondary sources to examine how the lived experience of race and ethnicity shapes and is shaped by local, regional, and global dimensions.

This course forms part of the "Doing History" series: rigorous undergraduate colloquia that introduce the practice of history within a particular field or thematic area. Doing the History of Science and Technology. The history of science has often been at the crux of key debates in the larger field of history, including debates over objectivity and bias, relativism and the problem of "present-ism.

The course introduces major approaches to economic history such as the classical school, Malthusianism, Marxism and Dependency theories, moral economic critique, institutionalism, technological determinism, environmentalism, and the Anthropocene thesis. Using these approaches, students will explore themes including pre-modern agrarian orders; the emergence of fiscal-military state; financial and commercial expansion; diverse property regimes; the industrial revolution; growth and poverty; markets and networks; labor and capital; the rise of capitalism and imperialisms; immigration; formal and informal economies; development and underdevelopment; globalization and environmental crisis.

Special emphasis will be given to the theories of the Great Divergence, namely why the West became the dominant economic power over the rest of the world and how different economic cultures responded to that. The genre of microhistory was expressly invented in the s to recover the voices of people usually neglected in the past, often based on scanty sources. It's an exciting and risky endeavor, as the historian often has to fill in details lacking in the sources, a historical tightrope act.

Class includes three sessions with authors of microhistory who share how they met these challenges:Profs. Students explore exemplary historical works based on oral histories and develop a range of practical skills while completing their own interviews. Topics include oral history and narrative theory, interview techniques, transcript preparation, and digital archiving.

Students also learn how to analyze interviews using both qualitative and quantitative methods, practice writing history using oral evidence, and experiment with digital humanities approaches for disseminating oral history, including the Stanford Oral History Text Analysis Project. Doing Literary History: Orwell in the World. This course will bring together the disciplines of history and literary studies by looking closely at the work of one major twentieth-century author: the British writer and political polemicist George Orwell. In , Orwell writes, "What I have most wanted to do throughout the past ten years is to make political writing into an art.

These include British imperialism in Burma, urban poverty in Europe, class inequality in England, the conflict between Socialism and Fascism in Spain, and the rise of totalitarianism in the Soviet Union. In engaging all of these events, Orwell experiments with different literary forms, moving between fiction and non-fiction, novel and autobiography, essay and memoir, manifesto and fable, literature and journalism.

Considers functions, practices, and reception of history in public arena, including museums, memorials, naming of buildings, courtrooms, websites, op-eds. Analyzes controversies arising when historians' work outside the academy challenges the status quo; role funders, interest groups, and the public play in promoting, shaping, or suppressing historical interpretation.

Who gets to tell a group's story? What changes can public history enable? Students will engage in public history projects. Showcases issues and careers in public history with guest speakers.

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Explores the global story of the struggle over drugs from the nineteenth century to the present. Topics include the history of the opium wars in China, controversies over wine and tobacco in Iran, narco-trafficking and civil war in Lebanon, the Afghan 'narco-state,' Andean cocaine as a global commodity, the politics of U. Spatial History: Concepts, Methods, Problems. What can digital mapping and spatial analysis bring to history? How have historians written spatial history in the past? How do scholars in other disciplines deal with space and what can we learn from them?

The course provides students with conceptual and technical skills in spatial history. As part of the exercise to think spatially about the past, students will receive training in Geographic Informational Science GIS and develop their own spatial history projects.

No prior technical skills are needed for this course. The U. Peacekeeping, and Humanitarian War. The involvement of U. The UN Charter's provisions on the use of force, the origins and evolution of peacekeeping, the reasons for the breakthrough to peacemaking and peace enforcement in the 90s, and the ongoing debates over the legality and wisdom of humanitarian intervention.

History Goes Pop! Songwriting the Past. Historical research doesn't always take the form of a thesis, an article, or a book. Sometimes, research leads to film, museum exhibits, works of art, or In this class, students will collaborate to write, record, and produce original pop music perhaps even an entire album based on original research in Stanford's wealth of archives and Special Collections. The thematic focus of the class will be on the global history of civil rights and social justice movements during the modern period.

This class considers objects as historical sources. It surveys diverse approaches to the study and display of physical evidence, from "material culture" to "making. With its focus on the question of what historical knowledge can be gained through interactivity, the course is suited to students whose interests include museums and public history, reenactment and performance, the maker movement, or interdisciplinary methodology.

Many of the basic commodities that we consider staples of everyday life became part of an increasingly interconnected world of trade, goods, and consumption between and This seminar offers an introduction to the material culture of the late medieval and early modern world, with an emphasis on the role of European trade and empires in these developments. We will examine recent work on the circulation, use, and consumption of things, starting with the age of the medieval merchant, and followed by the era of the Columbian exchange in the Americas that was also the world of the Renaissance collector, the Ottoman patron, and the Ming connoisseur.

This seminar will explore the material horizons of an increasingly interconnected world, with the rise of the Dutch East India Company and other trading societies, and the emergence of the Atlantic economy. It concludes by exploring classic debates about the "birth" of consumer society in the eighteenth century. How did the meaning of things and people's relationships to them change over these centuries? What can we learn about the past by studying things?. The course analyzes the evolution, functions, structures and consequences of surveillance in the modern era.

Among issues discussed are the rise of the modern state and population politics, information gathering and its uses in domestic and national security arenas, institutions of surveillance in various regimes, the challenge of privacy and ethical dilemmas. Clausewitz conceptualized war as always consisting of a trinity of passion, chance, and reason, mirrored, respectively, in the people, army and government. Following Clausewitz, this course examines the peoples, armies, and governments that shaped World War II.

Analyzes the ideological, political, diplomatic and economic motivations and constraints of the belligerents and their resulting strategies, military planning and fighting. Explores the new realities of everyday life on the home fronts and the experiences of non-combatants during the war, the final destruction of National Socialist Germany and Imperial Japan, and the emerging conflict between the victors. How the peoples, armies and governments involved perceived their possibilities and choices as a means to understand the origins, events, dynamics and implications of the greatest war in history.

Climate Politics: Science and Global Governance. Formerly IPS Provides a unique perspective on contemporary debates about climate change through a study of their long history. After some background about climate science and a look at how people thought about climate in the 18th, 19th, and early 20th centuries, we explore the co-evolution of climate science and climate politics from World War II to the present. The approach is to examine a series of political issues and debates that established human effects on the global atmosphere as serious problems. Assignments include in-class presentations and a policy brief.

The Holocaust and Its Aftermath. This seminar gives an overview over different aspects of the history of the Holocaust and its aftermath and will examine key issues in recent Holocaust historiography and questions of memory and representation. Special emphasis is put on the nature of the historian's task, as viewed through the lens of historians of the Holocaust, as well as to the significance of the Holocaust in history and how it has changed over time.

The course will confront students with historiographical texts and historical documents, with photography and film, works of scholarship and art. Scholars pay a lot of attention to knowledge--how it arises and impacts society--but much less attention has been given to ignorance, even though its impacts are equally profound.

Here we explore the political history of ignorance, through case studies including: corporate denials of harms from particular products tobacco, asbestos , climate change denialism, and creationist rejections of Darwinian evolution. Students will be expected to produce a research paper tracing the origins and impact of a particular form of ignorance. Nuclear Insecurity in the Bay Area and Beyond. This upper-level course explores the history of radioactive contamination in the Bay Area and elsewhere.

We'll examine the legacy of atomic bomb testing in our region and the current political implications of that legacy. We'll then explore the colonial and postcolonial dimensions of the nuclear age and the long-term contamination it has produced. Case studies vary yearly; they include uranium mining in Africa, nuclear testing in the Pacific, and accidents at Chernobyl and Fukushima.

At least one field trip!. Advanced Topics in Agnotology. Advanced research into the history of ignorance. Our goal will be to explore how ignorance is created, maintained and destroyed, using case studies from topics such as tobacco denialism, global climate denialism, and other forms of resistance to knowledge making. Course culminates in a research paper on the theory and practice of agnotology, the science of ignorance. This course analyzes the evolution and nature of revolutionary and totalitarian polities through the reading of monographs on the Puritan Reformation, French Revolutionary, turn of the 20th Century, interwar, and Second World War eras.

Among topics explored are the essence of modern ideology and politics, the concept of the body national and social, the modern state, state terror, charismatic leadership, private and public spheres, totalitarian economies, and identities and practices in totalitarian polities. Freedom in Chains: Black Slavery in the Atlantic, ss. This course will focus on the history of slavery in the British, French, Spanish, Portuguese and Dutch Atlantic world s , from the late s to the s. Its main focus will be on the experiences of enslaved Africans and their descendants.

Between the sixteenth and nineteenth centuries, the Europeans forcibly embarked over 10 million Africans to the Americas. Drawing on methodologies used by historians, archaeologists and anthropologists, the course will reconstruct the daily lives and the socio-economic, cultural and political histories of these captives. We will seek to hear their voices by investigating a variety of historical testimonies and recent scholarship. The course will examine slavery in the context of broader trends in Atlantic World studies, a field that has grown considerably in recent years, providing new ways of understanding historical developments across national boundaries.

We will seek to identify commonalities and differences across time periods and regions and the reasons for those differences. Covered topics will include slave ship voyages, labor, agency, the creation of new identities creolization , religion, race, gender, resistance, legacies, and memory. This course examines the "Age of Revolution," spanning the 18th and 19th centuries. Primarily, this course will focus on the American, French, and Haitian Revolutions which overthrew both French and white planter rule.

Taken together, these events reshaped definitions of citizenship, property, and government. But could republican principles-- color-blind in rhetoric-- be so in fact? Could nations be both republican and pro-slavery? Studying a wide range of primary materials, this course will explore the problem of revolution in an age of empires, globalization, and slavery. City, Society, Literature- 19th Century Histories. This course examines the rise of modern cities through an analysis of urban society and the imaginative literature of the s.

For this purpose the seminar offers four mock staff rides, facilitating highly engaged, well-researched experience for participants. Students will research their roles and, during the staff ride, will be required to explain "their" decisions and actions. Staff rides will not deviate from historical records, but closely examine how decisions were made, what pressures and forces were in action, battle outcomes, etc.

This in-depth examination will allow students to gain a deeper understanding of how modern tactics, technology, means of communications, and the scale of warfare can decide, and indeed decided, campaigns. We will will spend two weeks preparing for and playing each staff ride. The second meeting will be dedicated to the battle itself.

The four battles will illustrate major developments in modern warfare. Global Humanities: The Grand Millennium, How should we live? This course explores two ethical pathways: mysticism and rationality. They seem to be opposites, but as we'll see, some important historical figures managed to follow both at once. We will read works by successful judges, bureaucrats, academics, and lovers written between and C. We will ask ourselves whether we agree with their choices and judgments about professional success and politics. While exploring each place in a particular historical moment, we will also consider the relations between culture, power, and social life.

How does the cultural life of a country intersect with the political activity of a capital? How do large cities shape our everyday experience, our aesthetic preferences, and our sense of history?

Why do some cities become cultural capitals? Primary materials for this course will consist of literary, visual, sociological, and historical documents in translation ; authors we will read include Boccaccio, Dante, Sor Juana, Montesquieu, Baudelaire, Gogol, Irmgard Keun, Freud, and Borges. The relationship between biographical and historical writing, primarily in Europe and America. Problems of methodology, evidence, dispassion, and empathy. Texts: biographies, critical literature on biographical work, and novels A. Byatt's Possession , Bernard Malamud's Dubin's Lives that illuminate the intellectual underpinnings of biographical labor.

Environment, Technology and Revolution in World History. Exploration of historiographical and interdisciplinary methodologies and approaches to intersections among environmental, technological, and revolutionary social change in diverse geographical and temporal contexts. Readings include broad theoretical and synthetic works as well as case studies of American, French, Mexican, Russian, Chinese, and Hungarian revolutions.

Colloquium on the history of transgender practices and identities. Readings will include scholarly texts from the emerging historical field of transhistory as well as adjacent fields within gender history. Colloquium will investigate avenues for deepening transhistory through further historical inquiry. Changing contexts of women's lives and how women's actions have shaped and responded to those contexts.

This course examines the evolving nature of warfare and its impact on society across the Eurasian continent up to the Gunpowder Revolution and rise of the nation-state. Beginning with an attempt to define war, it will trace the evolution of military technology from the Stone Age through the rise of the chariot, the sword, and the mounted rider, and examine how changing methods of conducting warfare were inextricably linked to changes in the social order and political structures.

Forms of injustice in history including slavery, genocide, ethnic cleansing, mass rape, forced religious conversion, and torture of prisoners. Mechanisms developed over the last century to define, deter, and alleviate the effects of such offenses, including war crimes tribunals, truth commissions, national apologies, and monetary reparations. Case studies chart the international field of retrospective justice, exploring the legal, political, and moral implications of confronting traumatic pasts. Can we live without politics?

Is politics indispensable for humanity and vice-versa? The idea of politics is that it must transform, through human action, conditions of collective life. But the 20th century produced colliding beliefs about what that life might be and what the human being itself might look like.

Explore whether, after the century, we might still think of politics as an ethical idea and the "human" as foundational political category. Postcolonialism and Universalism. Key texts and motifs from postcolonial theory: empire, class, exile, suffering, textuality, archive in juxtaposition to 20th-century philosophical questions about universal history and the relevance of humanist inquiry. Maps in the Early Modern World.

The significance of cartographic enterprise across the early modern world. Political, economic, and epistemological imperatives that drove the proliferation of nautical charts, domain surveys, city plans, atlases, and globes; the types of work such artifacts performed for their patrons, viewers, and subjects. Contributions of indigenous knowledge to imperial maps; the career of the map in commerce, surveillance, diplomacy, conquest, and indoctrination.

Sources include recent research from Asia, Europe, and the Americas. The question of surveillance and its limits is increasingly becoming a concern for individuals, organizations, and states around the globe. Indeed, from NSA databases to Alexa recordings, surveillance seems to be an unavoidable aspect of modern life. But how did surveillance become an everyday experience? This course explores the technological advancements, political aims, ideological commitments, and military goals that have fueled the rise of surveillance, especially throughout the past century.

We will examine the ways in which states and organizations have developed surveillance programs and the consequences that these programs have had on both the watchers and the watched. Required of History majors. How to conduct original, historical research and analysis, including methods such as using the libraries and archives at Stanford and elsewhere, and working collaboratively to frame topics, identify sources, and develop analyses.

The History of Occupation, Examines the major cases of occupation in the twentieth century, from the first World War until the present, and issues of similarities, differences, and implications for contemporary policy making. Discussions will revolve around the problems, efficacy, and effects of occupation in historical perspective. This course examines the long pedigree of modern deportations and mass expulsions, from the forced resettlements of the ancient world to the expulsion of Jews from Spain in , and from the outlawry of Saga-era Iceland to the culture of civic exile in Renaissance Italy.

The course focuses on Europe and the Mediterranean from antiquity to the early modern period, but students are welcome to venture beyond these geographical and chronological boundaries for their final papers.

ARTICULOS DESTACADOS

Renaissances: Living, Learning, and Loving around the Mediterranean. This course explores three watershed moments in Mediterranean history: the Carolingian Renaissance, the Twelfth-Century Renaissance, and the Italian Renaissance. The class examines how each renaissance redefined a specific place and how those changes influenced connections across the Mediterranean world. Same as: CE. This course examines the cultural worlds of medieval women through particular attention to the books that they owned, commissioned, and created.

Minorities In Medieval Europe. This course examines attitudes towards outsider groups within medieval society and the treatment of these groups by medieval Christians. Heretics, Jews, Muslims, homosexuals, prostitutes and usurers occupied ambivalent and at time dangerous positions within a society that increasingly defined itself as Christian. Differences in the treatment of these various 'outcast' groups, their depiction in art, their legal segregation, and their presumed association with demonic activity are addressed through discussion, and readings from primary and secondary source material.

Science, Technology, and Modernity in the Soviet Union. Science and technology were integral to the Soviet claim to offer a vision of modernity superior to that of Western capitalism. Science and technology would flourish; society would develop on a scientific basis. The results were more complex than the vision.

Social values, gender relations, and social change in an era of rapid change; challenges to established norms by new constructions of deviance witchcraft, religious reform, and revolt and new standards of civility; encounters with non-Russians and the construction of national consciousness. Social values as political ethos: patrimonial autocracy and the reality of female rule in the late 17th and 18th century.

Explores criminal law in early modern Europe and Russia, ca , in law and in practice. Engages debates about use of exemplary public executions as tactic of governance, and about gradual decline in "violence" in Europe over this time. Explores practice of accusatory and inquisitory judicial procedures, judicial torture, forms of punishment, concepts of justice.

follow url Art and Ideas in Imperial Russia. Poetry, novels, symphonic music, theater, opera, painting, design, and architecture: what they reveal about the politics and culture of tsarist Russia. This course explores the cities of the Habsburg, Ottoman and Russian empires in the dynamic and turbulent period of their greatest transformation from the 19th century through the Two World Wars.

Through the reading of urban biographies of Venice and Trieste, Vienna, Budapest, Cracow, Lviv, Sarajevo, Belgrade, Salonica, and Odessa, we consider broad historical trends of political, economic, and social modernization, urbanization, identity formation, imperialism, cosmopolitanism, and orientalism. As vibrant centers of coexistence and economic exchange, social and cultural borderlands, and sites of transgression, these cities provide an ideal lens through which to examine these themes in the context of transition from imperial to post-imperial space. Genocide and Humanitarian Intervention.

Open to medical students, graduate students, and undergraduate students. Traces the history of genocide in the 20th century and the question of humanitarian intervention to stop it, a topic that has been especially controversial since the end of the Cold War. The pres discussion begins with the Armenian genocide during the First World War and includes the Holocaust and Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge in the s.

Coverage of genocide and humanitarian intervention since the s includes the wars in Bosnia, Rwanda, Kosovo, the Congo and Sudan. Formative issues in Russian history from Muscovy to the present: autocracy and totalitarianism; tsars, emperors, and party secretaries; multi-ethnicity and nationalism; serfdom, peasantry; rebellions and revolutions, dissent and opposition; law and legality; public and private spheres; religion and atheism; patterns of collapse. Class format will be discussion of one to two assigned books or major articles per class.

The Holocaust: Causes, Consequences, Memory. Overview of the history of the Holocaust, the genocide of European Jews. Explores its causes, course, consequences, and memory. Addresses the events themselves, as well as the roles of perpetrators and bystanders, dilemmas faced by victims, collaboration of local populations, and the issue of rescue. Considers how the Holocaust was and is remembered and commemorated by victims and participants alike.

Uses different kinds of sources: scholarly work, memoirs, diaries, film, and primary documents. Examines the major famines of modern history, the controversies surrounding them, and the reasons that famine persists in our increasingly globalized world. Focus is on the relative importance of natural, economic, and political factors as causes of famine in the modern world. Case studies include the Great Irish Famine of the s; the Bengal famine of ; the Soviet famines of and ; China's Great Famine of ; the Ethiopian famines of the s and 80s, and the Somalia famines of the s and of All Quiet on the Eastern Front?

Until recently history has been comparatively quiet about the experience of World War I in the east. Far from being a peripheral theater of war, however, the experiences of war on the Eastern Front were central to shaping the 20th century. Not only was the first shot of the war fired in the east, it was also the site of the most dramatic political revolution.

Using scholarly texts, literature and film, this course combines political, military, cultural and social approaches to introduce the causes, conduct and consequences of World War I with a focus on the experiences of soldiers and civilians on the Eastern Front. Topics include: the war of movement, occupation, extreme violence against civilians, the Armenian genocide, population exchanges, the Russian Revolution and civil war, and the disintegration of empires and rise of nation-states.

Looks at the experience and representation of Poland's wartime history from the Nazi-Soviet Pact to the aftermath of Yalta Examines Nazi and Soviet ideology and practice in Poland, as well as the ways Poles responded, resisted, and survived. Considers wartime relations among Polish citizens, particularly Poles and Jews. In this regard, interrogates the traditional self-characterization of Poles as innocent victims, looking at their relationship to the Holocaust, thus engaging in a passionate debate still raging in Polish society.

The rise of the witness as icon and debates about its reliability as a historical source. The power of eyewitness accounts to convict accused criminals, inspire indignation about war and genocide, and attract attention to humanitarian crises. Their notorious unreliability due to exaggeration and misapprehension. Sources include reportage, photography, and documentary film. Case studies include criminal cases, war, poverty, and natural disasters.

Paris: Capital of the Modern World. This course explores how Paris, between the eighteenth and twentieth centuries, became the political, cultural, and artistic capital of the modern world. It considers how the city has both shaped and been shaped by the tumultuous events of modern history- class conflict, industrialization, imperialism, war, and occupation.

It will also explore why Paris became the major world destination for intellectuals, artists and writers. Sources will include films, paintings, architecture, novels, travel journals, and memoirs. Course taught in English with an optional French section. Europe in the World, Present. The European conquest of parts of Africa, Asia, and the South Pacific by European merchants, missionaries, armies, and administrators had significant, and often cataclysmic, effects on indigenous political alliances, cultural practices, and belief systems.

But were the effects of expansion entirely one-sided? What impact did the experiences of colonialism have on European politics, culture,and Europe's relations with the rest of the world? Explores how interaction between Europe and the rest of the world redefined the political, racial, sexual, and religious boundaries of both Europe and its colonies and gave rise to the more "globalized' society we live in today.

What is a book? This seminar explores the conceptual implications of approximately two millennia of transformations in the physical and material properties of books. How have the meaning and authority we assign the written word changed as technologies of book production and dissemination have evolved, and how have they remained continuous?

Topics covered include the rise of the medieval manuscript codex, the emergence of print culture in early modern Europe, and current debates over the nature of text in the digital age. Readings in and discussion of theological and social aspects of sixteenth century reformations: Luther, Radical Reform, Calvin, and Council of Trent, missionary expansion, religious conflict, creative and artistic expressions. Texts include primary sources and secondary scholarly essays and monographs. Between , Venice created a powerful empire at the boundary between East and West that controlled much of the Mediterranean, with a merchant society that allowed social groups, religions, and ethnicities to coexist.

Topics include the features of Venetian society, the relationship between center and periphery, order and disorder, orthodoxy and heresy, the role of politics, art, and culture in the Venetian Renaissance, and the empire's decline as a political power and reinvention as a tourist site and living museum. We will read a series of plays set in or around early modern London, written by playwrights such as Ben Jonson, Thomas Middleton, and John Marston. Colloquium on the history of early modern European cities, covering urbanization, street life, neighborhoods, fortifications, guilds and confraternities, charity, vagrancy, and begging, public health, city-countryside relationship, urban constitutions, and confederations.

Assignments include annotated bibliography, book review, and a final paper. Current scholarship on Britain,, focusing on political and religious history. Topics include: causes and consequences of the English civil war and revolution; rise and fall of revolutionary Puritanism; the Restoration; popular politics in the late 17th century; changing contours of religious life; the crisis leading to the Glorious Revolution; and the new order that emerged after the deposing of James II.

Political Thought in Early Modern Britain. Theorists include Hobbes, Locke, Harrington, the Levellers, and lesser known writers and schools. Foundational ideas and problems underlying modern British and American political thought and life. Catholic Politics in Europe, What led to the creation of a specifically Catholic mass politics? How did these parties and movements interact with the Vatican and the wider Church?

What accounts for political Catholicism's involvement in clerical-fascist states and its important role in shaping the EU? Sources focus on monographs. Research paper using primary sources. The Invention of the Modern Republic. Examines the history of republican thinking in the Atlantic World from the Renaissance to the French Revolution. The dynamic societies of the Italian Peninsula of the 14th to 16th centuries "prosperous, astonishingly creative, politically fractious, and endemically violent" produced sweeping, deeply consequential changes.

Among these were new developments in the theory and practice of war, politics, and diplomacy that laid the foundations for the modern state system and European military power. The class covers: new diplomatic practice; the Military Revolution; state-building; war finance; court culture; and the intersection of these with the shimmering brilliance of Renaissance culture. Readings in the Supernatural. Class will read and discuss a selection of monographs, scholarly essays, and primary sources on the rich supernatural world of early modern Europe.

We will discuss how fairies, werewolves, nightmares, and trolls all became witches, how the binary of angels and demons figured in European thought, and how the marginalized imaginary was reconstituted in theatre and fiction. In , the Italian mathematician Galileo was tried and condemned for advocating that the sun, not the earth, was the center of the cosmos. The Catholic Church did not formally admit that Galileo was right until Examines the many factors that led to the trial of Galileo and looks at multiple perspectives on this signal event in the history of science and religion.

Considers the nature and definition of intellectual heresy in the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, and examines the writings of Galileo's infamous predecessor Giordano Bruno burned at the stake in Looks closely at documents surrounding the trial and related literature on Renaissance and Reformation Italy in order to understand the perspectives of various participants in this famous event. Focal point of seminar involves the examination of the many different histories that can be produced from Galileo's trial. What, in the end, were the crimes of Galileo?.

From his birth in into a poor family in Algeria to the Nobel Prize in Literature in , from Paris to the Mediterranean world, Camus engaged in the great ethical battles of his time, from the fight against nazism and communism, from questioning colonial rules to the Algerian War of Independence. Through readings and films, we will explore his multiple, long-lasting legacies. Yehoshua, Yasmina Khadra. This course is a WIM course. Students will work on their production of written French, in addition to speaking French and reading comprehension.

Taught in French. Can a commitment to liberty, progress, and universal rights be reconciled with imperialism? The ethical underpinnings of empire; how modern Europeans provided ethical and political justifications for colonial expansion. How European ideals were used to defend and justify inequality, violence, and genocide. The ethics of American-driven globalization and humanitarianism. Texts include primary sources, philosophical treatises, and historical studies.

The years stretching from roughly to end of the First World War were marked by profound social upheaval and an intense burst of creativity. This seminar will focus on the major cultural movements and big ideas of the period. In this course we will examine ideas radical to their context in modern European thought, paying close attention to what it has meant to explain features of society, government, and politics in terms of power.

What is power? What is human nature, and do all humans possess natural rights? How is human identity interwoven with the practice of power? What makes an idea radical? James, and Michel Foucault. This seminar explores the history of urban planning in twentieth-century Europe.

We will discuss visions of ideal cities and attempts at their implementation in the context of democratic and authoritarian systems as well as capitalism and socialism. Through case studies from eastern and western Europe--from Berlin in Germany to Nowa Huta in Poland--we will examine how broader historical trends played out in, and were shaped by, specific local circumstances.

The seminar is intended for advanced undergraduate students.